Lime Kiln Crossing North, 1893-1910

Location & historical notes: Lower Detroit River in Canadian waters; the station continued to be maintained by the Canadian government from 1910-1913 when it was then discontinued and replaced by buoyage and range lights.

Lightships assigned:

1893-1910: LV-65 (The only lightship to occupy this station.)

YEAR BUILT: 1893

BUILT AT: Wyandotte (MI)

BUILDER: ?

APPROPRIATION: $8,600
(Approp. Aug 5, 1892 for 3 small lightships, Detroit River)

CONTRACT PRICE: $993 ($2,980 for 3 vessels)

SISTER VESSELS: LV 63,64

DESIGN: Square ended wood scow; oak fastened with iron bolts and spikes; 12 ft tripod lantern structure on foredeck; deckhouse aft

LENGTH: 38' (loa); BEAM: 12'2"; DRAFT: 2'6"; TONNAGE: 16.7 gross

PROPULSION: None

ILLUMINATING APPARATUS: Single lantern with 3 oil lamps shown from 12 ft tripod

FOG SIGNAL: Hand operated bell

CONSTRUCTION NOTES - MODIFICATIONS - EQUIPMENT CHANGES & IMPROVEMENTS: LV 65-
One of 3 small vessels "cheaply built" for "temporary" service in the Detroit River; built in part to eliminate proliferation of existing private aids, and in part to serve "until Congress makes arrangements for lighting this important channel-
Although differing somewhat in measurements and details, all 3 vessels were built to the same design and specifications, and under the same contract-
1902: Aug 27-Sep 15, repaired for collision damage-
1906: Aug, repaired for collision damage


STATION ASSIGNMENTS: LV 65

1892-1910: Limekiln Crossing North

(Station discontinued by US in 1910, responsibility for marking the station assumed by Canadian government - see Historical Notes)

HISTORICAL NOTES: LV 65-
During 1891/92 it was considered desirable for the Government to mark the NW and SW corners of the Limekiln Crossing (a narrow curved cut which had been constructed and dredged by the U.S. at great expense). Providing aids "under orders and discipline of the Light-House Establishment" would eliminate need for a variety of private light floats and other private aids, and provide temporary and inexpensive service until Congress would approve permanent lighting arrangements for the Detroit River. Since the location was entirely in Canadian waters, permission of Canada was obtained to establish 2 lightship stations and 2 vessels were built for the purpose-
1893: Sep 15, placed on Limekiln Crossing North; painted white with black lettering-Thereafter withdrawn from station during the period the Lakes were closed to navigation, usually early Dec through Mar/Apr each year. Necessary repairs were performed during winter lay-up at Detroit-
1898: Consumed 26 gal oil, 2 tons coal during the year-
1900: Jun 20, in collision with passing barge, slight damage-
1902: Position occasionally shifted due to dredging operations in progress-
1906: Aug 25, in collision with barge; relieved for repair by LV 63 until Dec 7.

More notes: LV 65-
1907: May 10, struck by steamer but remained on station-
1910: Decommissioned by U.S. Responsibility for station was assumed by
Canada with former LV 65 being operated and maintained by Canada until
1913 when replaced by lighted buoys

RETIRED FROM LIGHTSHIP DUTY: 1910; AGE: 17

SUBSEQUENT DISPOSITION: Decommissioned by U.S. in 1910, sold to Canada then
became Canadian lightship serving on same station until 1913

COMMANDING OFFICERS: LV 65
1897-1902: Thomas Cooney, Master

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